Tag Archives: Isaiah

Isaiah’s Parable of the Vineyard (Isaiah 5:1-12)

Isaiah A Study of Selected Texts

Isaiah’s Parable of the Vineyard (Isaiah 5:1-12)

  • 5:1-2 – The vineyard as a symbol of Israel (Psalm 80; Jeremiah 12:10; Mark 12:1-10)
    • Isaiah adapts his delivery but not the message
    • “My Well-beloved” = God
    • “The choicest vine” = Abraham, Isaac, Jacob
    • “Wild grapes” are toxic/poisonous
  • 5:3-6 – A song of lament
    • Similar in method to Nathan (2 Samuel 12:1-15) and Jesus (Matthew 21:33-43; Mark 12:1-9)
    • Limits of God’s power: He will not violate man’s free will (Matthew 23:37; 2 Peter 3:9)
  • 5:7 – The meaning of the parable
    • Paronomasia (pun in which the words sound similar but have different meanings)
    • Justice (mishpat) vs. oppression/bloodshed (mispah)
    • Righteousness (sedakah) vs. a cry (seakah)
  • 5:8-10 – The first woe
    • Against land-grabbing (Micah 2:2; Jeremiah 22:13-17; Habakkuk 2:9-12)
    • Drastically reduced harvest (Leviticus 26:20; Deuteronomy 26:15,18; Haggai 1:5-6)
  • 5:11-12 – The second woe
    • Against drunken revelry (1 Peter 4:1-4; Ephesians 5:18; Romans 13:13; Galatians 5:19-21)
    • God was not a priority (Amos 6:1-7; Matthew 6:33; Colossians 3:1-2)

Discussion Questions

1. What had God done to ensure the success of the vineyard?

2. How did God respond to the vineyard’s failure?

3. What is wrong with acquiring houses and fields?

4. What are some popular songs that Christians should avoid because of content?

5. Jesus warned against a preoccupation with the “riches and pleasures of life” (Luke 8:14); what is the result of such according to Christ?

Rebellion and Restoration (Isaiah 1:1-20)

Isaiah A Study of Selected Texts

Rebellion and Restoration (Isaiah 1:1-20)

  • 1:1 – Isaiah = Yesha-Yahu = “Jehovah is salvation”
    • Son of Amoz; married to a prophetess (8:3); 2 sons (7:3; 8:3)
    • Prophesied during the reigns of Uzziah (767-740 BC), Jotham (750-736 BC), Ahaz (736-716 BC), Hezekiah (716-698 BC)
  • 1:2-9 – Judah is a “sinful nation,” “laden with iniquity,” “brood of evildoers,” “corrupters”
    • Their sin caused suffering
    • Is suffering always caused by sin? (Job 1:1; 1 Peter 3:17)
    • The description of desolation consistent with Micah 6:13-16 and corresponds with Lev. 26 and Deut. 28
  • 1:10-15 – God does not want sacrifice without submission
    • Proverbs 15:8; 1 Timothy 2:8; James 5:16
    • “Rite without right is wrong” (Clyde M. Woods)
  • 1:16-17 – Restoration is called for
    • “Repentance is surrender; a change of thinking, willing, acting; a life directed toward the will of God as revealed in His Word” (Butler)
    • Cessation of evil must be accompanied by commencement of right (Ephesians 4:25-32)
  • 1:18-20 – Reason is a big part of righteousness
    • Paul reasoned (Acts 17:2,17; 18:4,19; 19:8-9; 24:25)
    • “The words of truth and reason” (Acts 26:25)
    • Living sacrifice = “reasonable service” (Rom. 12:1)
    • Choice: “willing and obedient” or “refuse and rebel” (Romans 11:22)

Discussion Questions

1. What is the force of the comparison of the people of Judah to the ox and donkey?

2. What sickness did the people have?

3. God commanded sacrifices through Moses; here, He says He takes no pleasure in them. Does He contradict Himself?

4. What positive commands were the people given?

5. Is it reasonable to serve God? Why or why not?