Tag Archives: Romans 5

Read the New Testament in a year, one chapter a day, five days a week

Day 57/260: Read Romans 5

God should have known better. He should have known that His creation would turn their backs on Him and rebel. He should have known that they would reject Him and deny Him and hate Him. God should have known better.

Jesus should have known better. He should have known that, despite showing power over nature and using miracles to heal the sick, He would be reviled. Rejected. Despised. He should have known that His closest friends in the flesh would run away when times got tough. They would deny knowing Him. They would hand Him over to His enemies. His friends would watch His enemies torture Him and kill Him on a cross, a humiliating and excruciating death.

God should have known better. Jesus should have known better.

Here’s the thing: they did know.

“But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.”

Despite our hatred, He loved us. Despite everything we had done and everything that we would do, He died for us.

God be praised for His love!

Memory (Copy into a notebook 5-10 times)

Romans 6:3. Or do you not know that as many of us as were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into His death?

Pray

Pray for a greater love for God and a greater love for each other. Pray that you may demonstrate the love described by Jesus in Mark 12:30-31 in your life.

Blessed in Christ

          Have you ever read something in the Scriptures that made you scratch your head? Jesus says in His famed sermon on the mount, “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted” (Matthew 5:4). How often have you felt “blessed” while mourning? Isn’t this a paradox?
          Throughout the Scriptures, we see what we would consider negative events lead to positive results. Consider the inspired words of Romans 5:3-4 (tribulation –> perseverance –> hope), Hebrews 12:11 (chastening –> peaceable fruit of righteousness), 2 Corinthians 7:10 (godly sorrow –> repentance leading to salvation), and James 1:2-3 (trials/testing of faith –> patience). In each instance, we start with something negative, but the end result is something positive.
          The mourning under consideration in Matthew 5 does not refer to everyday sorrows, as Paul tells us that “the sorrow of the world produces death” (2 Corinthians 7:10). J.W. McGarvey writes in his commentary on Matthew and Mark that this is “those who mourn in reference to sin. ‘They shall be comforted’ because now there is an ample provision made for pardon.”
          “But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, having now been justified by His blood, we shall be saved from wrath through Him. For if when we were enemies we were reconciled to God through the death of His Son, much more, having been reconciled, we shall be saved by His life. And not only that, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received the reconciliation.” (Romans 5:8-11)
          We no longer have to mourn over our hopelessness, but “rejoice” that “through (Christ) we have now received the reconciliation.” Truly we are blessed!