Tag Archives: Denominations

Deludedism*

John 8:31-32

I. APPLICATIONS FROM LIFE AND NATURE

    A. What is 2+2? What happens when you drink poison? When you shoot a loaded gun at someone?
    B. In nature, you reap what you sow (Galatians 6:7-8)
    C. The spiritual application (Matthew 7:15-23)

II. APPLICATIONS FROM THE OLD TESTAMENT

    A. Eve believed a lie (Genesis 3:1-6, 16-19)
    B. Jacob believed a lie (Genesis 37:28, 31-35)
    C. The prophet believed a lie (1 Kings 13:11-24)

III. APPLICATIONS FROM THE NEW TESTAMENT

    A. Saul of Tarsus (Acts 7:59-8:1; 9:1-2; 23:1)
    B. Cornelius (Acts 10-11)
    C. Apollos (Acts 18)
    D. Our advantage (John 8:31-32)

* You will not find this word in the dictionary. If you type “deludedism” into Microsoft Word, it will get the squiggly red underline. The word was made up by the late brother Paul Hodges, and I first heard it in a lesson he presented at Lehman Avenue church of Christ in Bowling Green, Kentucky, over fifteen years ago. On July 11, 2016, brother Hodges went home to his reward, and I know the Lord’s kingdom was benefited greatly by his service over the years. He was a gifted song leader and a dedicated servant, and he was staunch in his opposition to the various false “ism’s” of the religious world, including “deludedism.” The idea behind “deludedism” is this: it doesn’t matter what you believe, as long as you are honest and sincere, God will save you. What do you think? Is it a valid system of belief?

Should a Christian Give to the “Salvation Army”?

Each December, department stores are packed with holiday shoppers, bedecked with Christmas decorations, and at nearly every entrance will be a red kettle next to a person ringing a bell. The Salvation Army seems to be as much a part of the Christmas season as Santa Claus. This raises the question: “Should a Christian give to the Salvation Army?” This is a good question that should be carefully considered by every member of the Lord’s church as they decide how to use the money with which God has blessed them.

William Booth (1829-1912), a New Connection Methodist minister, organized the Salvation Army in the late nineteenth century. Brother Owen D. Olbricht, in his 1972 class booklet, Studies in Denominational Doctrine Book Two, says that one of the original purposes of the Salvation Army was to “help those in poverty”, and that they “provided boarding-houses, orphanages, maternity hospitals, and settlements in the poor quarters of the city” (p. 25). However, the Salvation Army is more than just a benevolent society. It is a religion with a well-defined body of doctrine, including much error.

While this denominational group holds to some of the more common errors, including total hereditary depravity and the direct operation of the Holy Spirit, there are some other religious errors that may come as a surprise to those who have never researched the group.

Not only does the Salvation Army believe baptism is unnecessary to salvation, they refuse to practice it. The same is true of the Lord’s Supper. “As it is the Salvation Army’s firm conviction that these ceremonies are not necessary to salvation nor essential to spiritual progress, we do not observe them” (The Salvation Army Handbook of Doctrine, p. 160). These words are a far cry from the teachings of the New Testament (Matthew 28:19-20; Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 20:7). They assert, “Water baptism was evidently not intended to be perpetually observed” (p. 163) and that the reference to the Lord’s Supper by the apostle Paul in 1 Corinthians 11 “should be interpreted spiritually” (p. 165).

The Salvation Army has corrupted the worship revealed in the New Testament as well. Christians are commanded to sing (Ephesians 5:19; Colossians 3:16), but the Salvation Army adds instrumental music to the worship service. Women preachers are accepted within the Salvation Army, dating back to the founder’s wife, Catherine Booth. The Scriptures clearly state that women are “not…to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man” (1 Timothy 2:12). Additionally, the Salvation Army finances its work in ways not authorized by the Scriptures, including those red kettles you find outside department stores during this time of year. In the New Testament, the church financed its work through the contributions of its members (1 Corinthians 16:2).

Returning to the question, “Should a Christian give to the Salvation Army?” I would counter with the question, “Should a Christian support an organization that teaches religious error?” What saith the Scriptures? Ephesians 5:11, “And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them.”

A Christian has no more business giving to the “Salvation Army” than he does to any other humanly-originated false religion or denomination.

Does Doctrine Matter?

Several years ago, Rick Warren released a book called The Purpose Driven Life. While the premise of the book is a good one, much religious error is propagated throughout its pages. It is not a book that should be read or studied by those who do not have a good grounding in the Scriptures, as they may be misled by the author’s errant views.

Take, for instance, what Mr. Warren says on page 34, concerning the final judgment: “God won’t ask you about your religious background or doctrinal views. The only thing that will matter is, did you accept what Jesus did for you and did you learn to love and trust him?”

Think about this statement for a moment. Does not one’s “religious background and doctrinal views” depend directly upon one’s acceptance, love, and trust of the Savior?

If one truly accepts Jesus, he will follow Him. “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me” (John 14:6). Do you accept Jesus as the only way into a righteous relationship with the Father?

If one truly loves Jesus, he will follow Him. “If you love Me, keep My commandments” (John 14:15). Do you obey Jesus, or do you only say you love Him?

If one truly trusts Jesus, he will follow Him. “He who believes and is baptized will be saved; but he who does not believe will be condemned” (Mark 16:16). Do you trust Jesus, or do you “explain away” this crystal-clear statement?

One who accepts, loves, and trusts Jesus will have the “religious background and doctrinal views” that God expects and desires of His people. “But as for you, speak the things which are proper for sound doctrine” (Titus 2:1).

Doctrine does matter! We must give heed to those things taught in the New Testament—not only accept them as true, but obey them! If we reject the words of the Lord, if we rebel against Him and refuse to obey, we have no one to blame if we are lost (John 12:48).

“My God is too big for one religion”

I have seen those words on a bumper sticker. Many people who call themselves Christians (regardless what the Bible says) would say something similar to that, though they would probably substitute the word “denomination” for “religion.” Ecumenism is a dangerous concept—“One church is as good as any other,” or, “You believe what you want to believe, and I’ll believe what I want to believe.” God is quite clear that there is but one faith (Ephesians 4:5), and that we are to “earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints” (Jude 3). People may call me intolerant, but I am more concerned with what God thinks than what man thinks (Galatians 1:10).

But this particular bumper sticker—“My God is too big for one religion”—takes the idea of ecumenism even further. If one truly believes this statement, then not only are all “Christian” denominations included, but so are all religions that outright reject the Christ – Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindu, etc.

A Roman Catholic priest once said on Larry King Live, “Jesus rejoices when His Father is glorified. And when a Muslim or Jew glorifies the Father I can’t imagine Jesus coming and saying, ‘Oh, well, when are you going to look at Me?’ The joy of Jesus is the glorification of God.” Yet, Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me” (John 14:6).

Melvin Talbert, ecumenical officer of the United Methodist Church, was asked by Larry King if he thought his religion was right. Talbert answered in the affirmative, but denied that all others were necessarily wrong. “I believe my God is large enough to be inclusive of all human beings who were created in God’s image and that includes those religions that are not Christians.”

God’s Word is firm: those who wish to come to the Father must do so by Jesus—not Mohammed, nor Buddha, nor the Pope, nor any other teacher of error. Jesus Christ is the way, the truth, and the life.